Teaching

Drawing I
An experiential learning course in drawing for the general education student as well as art majors, students learn the fundamentals of drawing realistically from life, including drawing edges, spaces, relationships, values, and color. Students will draw the traditional subjects of still life, landscape, and the portrait working with both linear and mass drawing materials.

Drawing II 
This course in drawing is designed for art majors as well as the interested and passionate novice. This course builds on and refines the experience of Drawing I, focusing on a variety of tonal and color media, and emphasizing the line. The course begins with formal concerns, and moves toward explorations in invention and abstraction. The course includes vocabulary development, critical analysis activities and references to historical models of drawing and the evolution of drawing, which will include figure drawing and life studies.

Art History
This course surveys the history of visual arts from pre-history to the present day. Through a close examination of individual works of art, students learn the artists, the art movements, and the art theories that have guided the creation of art in Western culture from the ancient world to the present. Students develop their ability to look at individual works of visual art with an informed, analytical, and practiced eye and write about art with intelligence and sensitivity. Students will visit the Art Institute of Chicago during the term.

Painting
This course teaches students the knowledge and skills need to paint realistically in both oils and acrylics. Students acquire the basics of color theory, learning how to choose a limited palette, to see color as value, and to develop a harmonious color schemes. Students learn to build paintings on a foundation of solid drawing, attending to content, composition and color to express their ideas in visual form. Through increasingly difficult painting projects, students practice the demands of painting the still life, the landscape, and the human figure.

Painting: Seminar
In this monthly two-hour session, Digital and Studio Arts majors are expected to gather to critique new work, and once per term, to prepare new work for the purpose of evaluation. At these sessions, all of the ARTS faculty and majors will attend giving the benefit of the variety of faculty and peer perspectives on individual works of art and current trends in art and culture. Majors take this course each term they are enrolled in the program.

Topics in Painting
This practicum capstone course extends from the disciplined studio arts practice. Assigned a campus studio and guided by assigned advisors, students reflect on their general education and their courses in the major, create a professional-level portfolio, and produce and display summative art project.

English Composition
In this course students learn the concepts and skills needed to write an effective, college-level expository essay. Through both traditional and workshop methods, students gain greater control over the writing process, essay organization, paragraph construction, and sentence grammar. The course introduces students to the active reading and summary writing skills needed in English 104. Before successfully completing the course, students must demonstrate basic competency in a portfolio of semester writing.

Academic Reading and Writing 
This course teaches students the concepts and skills needed to read and write with sources. Students learn how to find, read, summarize, and respond to a variety of college level texts. It teaches students print and electronic search techniques, analytic and synthetic reading skills, and the conventions of academic argument, culminating in ten pages of source-based writing.

The Literary Experience
Using classic and contemporary short stories and poems, this course introduces students to the elements of fiction and poetry and to the interpretive skills necessary to deepen their experience of great literature. Students study both Western literary classics and minority challenges to that tradition, examining the role of stories and poems in a meaningful life.

Honors English Composition 
In this course students learn the concepts and skills needed to write an effective, college-level expository essay. Through both traditional and workshop methods, students gain greater control over the writing process, essay organization, paragraph construction, and sentence grammar.

The Honors Learning Community:
A World Beyond the Classroom
Honors Seminar  (co-instructor)
ISS Study Abroad: Italy 2015 (co-instructor)
ISS Study Abroad: Spain 2016 (co-instructor)
ISS Study Abroad: England and Scotland 2017 (co-instructor)

In their junior year HLC students will receive an expenses paid international trip designed to engage them in the world beyond the classroom. Past destinations included London, Paris, Rome, Madrid, New York City and Washington D.C. These trips prepare HLC students to take their place in the world by teaching them cultural awareness, respect for individual differences, and giving them first-hand knowledge of the best our culture has to offer.

PACE College Preparation and Survival
PACE is designed for the incoming student who needs extra support on preparing for college-level reading, writing, and time-management strategies. PACE is designed to foster a sense of confidence through building competence and comfort in the college environment.

Life Experience Assessment Program (LEAP)
Students can earn credit for college-level knowledge and skills they have acquired through a variety of life experiences. A maximum of 30 semester hours of credit can be awarded through the Life Experience Assessment Program. Students must submit a life experience (LEAP) portfolio documenting their life experiences as they relate to college level courses. In order to qualify for this credit option, a student must have earned 12 credit hours, including a college-level English course.

Summer Reading Bridge (co-instructor)
This writing course prepares the student for college-level English by teaching the composition of grammatically correct sentences, well-organized paragraphs and longer papers, while focusing on the syntactical, grammatical and mechanical issues (e.g., prepositions, verbal phrases) common for ESL students. At the end of the course, the instructor will recommend the student registers for ENGL 095, 096, or 103. Not applicable toward a degree.

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